NaBITA offers a comprehensive program of consulting services from the top industry experts. The topics listed below are fully described when you click on the topic, and consulting visits can focus in on one topic or often cover a variety of the topics listed. Sample day-visit agendas are available by request and there are multiple examples below. For more details, contact Nicole Pasquini, Director of Client Relations at nicole.pasquini@nabita.org. If you have a specific topic or topics in mind, and don’t see what you are looking for, let Nicole know. We develop custom topics and training agendas for our clients all the time. You don’t have to be a member of NaBITA to engage a NaBITA consultant, and we provide off-site consultation as well as on-site visits. The most common on-site is a two-day visit.

Click here to view a roster of NaBITA’s Consultants.


ADDRESSING INTERVIEW/ASSESSMENT BIAS, MICROAGGRESSIONS, AND BUILDING CULTURAL COMPETENCE ON CAMPUS

In the wake of the recent election, colleges and universities have seen an increase in bias-related incidents and race-, gender-, and sexual orientation-based incidents on campus, in the classroom, in the residence halls, and around the campus community. This training provides an awareness of how issues of microaggressions, bias, and cultural competence impact the campus, along with some practical techniques to respond, de-escalate, and come together as a community.

These training topics are useful for the following groups:

  • Faculty and academic departments
  • Students
  • Student leaders and athletic team captains
  • Campus Behavioral Intervention Team members
  • Threat Assessment Team members
  • Front office staff in Health Center, Counseling Center, and Academic Affairs
  • Registrar and Financial Aid staff
  • Counseling and Health Center staff
  • Student Affairs staff
  • Student Activities and Greek Life representatives
  • Title IX Investigators and Student Conduct staff
  • Law Enforcement and Campus Security officers

BEHAVIORAL INTERVENTION TEAM (BIT) TRAINING FOR FACULTY

Campuses around the country are forming behavioral intervention teams and getting the word out to faculty and staff on the critical need to report concerning behavior. While we offer a workshop on how faculty should respond to concerning behavior, this workshop is specifically for faculty on what they should report to their behavioral intervention team, when and how. Faculty are “sensors” for purposes of campus threat assessment, and understanding the function of a sensor as an early warning mechanism is the purpose of this training. We cannot simply expect a culture of reporting to exist, we have to foster it. Faculty need to understand their role in the process, how much detail to provide, how much subjective “guesswork” to include, what happens when the team receives a report, what feedback will be given to the reporter, and what will remain confidential. We need to engender a culture that passes along all concerning behavior that reaches the level of a “red flag.” What is a “red flag”? This session will provide the answer, along with advice not to minimize the seriousness of incidents, to report when in doubt, so that we err on the side of caution. Who knows what else is being reported to the team about the same student by other members of the community? What may seem minor to one faculty member might seem like an avalanche when the team puts all of the pieces of the puzzle together. This training incorporates details from your campus behavioral intervention team for seamless integration and enhanced reporting.


BEST PRACTICES FOR CAMPUS BEHAVIORAL INTERVENTION AND THREAT ASSESSMENT

Now that your team is up and running, you must ensure that it is operating at maximum effectiveness. Do you need to increase your team’s proficiency and benchmark your practices against best practices?

This training gives your team the insights it needs to go to the next level, provided by the national experts who have led the charge toward behavioral intervention from the start. Your faculty helped implement the BIT model at more than 700 college and university campuses. Attendees will have the opportunity to spend two days with national experts who can address your questions, commiserate with your challenges, and share creative solutions to move your team forward.


BIT TOPICAL TRAININGS

1. Discussion of issues related to your team’s name, membership, advertising, and the development of an effective mission statement. You’ll have the opportunity to see sample advertising strategies and catchy logos, and hear about innovative approaches to inform the community about your team.

2. Conversation on the challenges of educating faculty members about disruptive and dangerous behavior in the classroom. Best practices to help them to better handle at-risk behaviors that fall more under classroom management than referrals to the police or BIT will be shared.

3. Strategies to identify, intervene, and manage suicidal students. From the initial contact to assessment for hospitalization, you’ll learn how the best teams manage suicidal students on campus. You’ll also learn about the legal limitations on removing suicidal students from campus, and how teams should handle the delicate task of parental notification.

4. Ways to identify, intervene, and manage students with more serious mental health concerns, such as bipolar disorder, autism-spectrum disorder (e.g. Asperger syndrome), and schizophrenia. What should team members know about these mental health conditions and how can they work more effectively with these students as they come in contact with the BIT? Learn how to address issues related to such students without running afoul of disability law.

5. Development of an outreach strategy to promote bystander intervention as a way of addressing sexual assault, dating violence, bullying, cyber-bullying, and hazing.

6. Use of the “Window Into BIT” video training tool to see how best practices in conducting BIT meetings, reviewing cases, using the NaBITA tool, and developing interventions should play out in real life.*

7. How to write notes for case managers, counselors, psychologists, and BIT members. Learn what well-written notes look like, and avoid some of the most common pitfalls to ensure your notes are as useful as possible while at the same time limit legal risk for your institution.

8. Refresher on how to apply the NaBITA threat assessment rubric consistently to all cases that come across the team’s desk. Several case studies designed to demonstrate how to best apply the tool to issues of disruptive behavior and mental health crises will be discussed. A group review of any school-specific cases the team would like to tackle can also be completed.

9. Training on the use and application of the SIVRA-35 tool. Using group discussion and new video demonstrations featuring a stalking case and faculty member who is aggressive with students, your understanding of the SIVRA-35 will be deepened.

10. Discussion on how to empower members of your campus community to identify and help at-risk students before they reach the crisis stage.

11. Primer on Title IX as it relates to your BIT. Learn the Title IX essentials your team members must know when dealing with cases that intersect with this law. Discussions on whether your team should have representation from the Title IX office, and how much is too much to share will help you ensure Title IX compliance.

12. Discussion of counseling confidentiality and scope of practice as it relates to the BIT. Can counselors and psychologists share information with the BIT? If so, when can they share and when must they not? What are other schools doing in terms of mandated counseling, and how the counseling center defines its scope of practice? What if the counselors we use aren’t licensed or don’t offer mental health treatment? How do such factors impact confidentiality?


BIT TUNE-UP

Perhaps you’ve had your BIT up and running for a year or more now and feel it may be time for a tune-up of its operations. Or maybe you’ve attended either our Foundations or Best Practices Course, but are looking for something more specifically tailored to your team’s needs. Looking for a refresher on how to use the NaBITA Tool? Wondering just how well you handled a high-risk case? Looking to expand your services to include mandated counseling or deepen your experience using the SIVRA-35 tool? Consider a day with Dr. Brian Van Brunt. He can offer your team an in-depth, customized training to address its specific needs. Dr. Van Brunt will review your policy and procedure manual, advertising, and risk rubric to ensure everything meets NaBITA’s standards.


CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT: PREVENTING AND RESPONDING TO DISRUPTIVE STUDENTS IN AND OUT OF THE CLASSROOM

Over the last ten years, there has been an increase in the number and severity of behavioral incidents in the classrooms and on campuses. More and more, it is incumbent upon instructors to intervene in the classroom to address behaviors that can interfere with teaching and learning. Using a combination of lecture and case studies taken from actual incidents, this workshop will provide instructors with tools to appropriately address these behaviors. Participants will be provided with skills to prevent disruptive behaviors, to react to them, and tips on how to enhance their own campus procedures to address abhorrent behaviors.

Learning Outcomes:

Participants will:

  • Gain a perspective on trends in behaviors on higher education campuses
  • Gain a perspective on the realities of campus responses to incidents of classroom disruption
  • Be able to utilize pedagogical methods and teaching strategies to reduce the probability of disruptive behaviors
  • Be able to develop and/or utilize individualized syllabus statements for class management
  • Be able to appropriately respond to disruptive behaviors in and out of the classroom
  • Be able to assist their home campuses in policy development in the area of classroom management

Workshop Outline:

I. Introductions

a. Participant Question Submission

II. College and University Behavioral Trends

III. Campus Policy analysis

a. Sample policies

IV. Analyzing behaviors

a. Disruptive behaviors

b. Distress behaviors

V. Preventive Measures

a. Syllabus statements

b. Pedagogical methods

VI. Reactive Measures

a. Addressing behaviors in the classroom

b. Addressing behaviors outside the classroom

c. Appropriate intervention techniques

VII. Case Studies

VIII. Question and Answer


CRISIS DE-ESCALATION OF HOSTILE AND VIOLENT STUDENTS

Based on his work and experience in Emergency Services, secure group home facilities, locked inpatient units, director of counseling and as an EMT, Dr. Brian Van Brunt has created a day-long training to assist faculty and staff learn how to calm hostile and violent students in the classroom and around campus.

This one-day training addresses what to do with students who present in a hostile and/or violent manner on campus.

The training will review:

  • How to recognize an emergency
  • Importance of activating back up and law enforcement
  • How to stay calm, cool and collected in the face of a crisis
  • Focus on the immediate risk and address secondary issues at a later point
  • Body language and posture
  • The use of motivation and persuasion
  • How to balance the “carrot and stick”
  • Preventative steps to create a safe office (escape routes, code words, and alert buttons)
  • Documentation and future action

This training will focus on the needs of staff and faculty who encountered individuals who have lost control and are at the point of violence. The workshop is useful for front office staff, administrators, instructors and professors, conduct officers, residential life staff, admissions and registration, financial aid and campus safety.

The day will include the use of role-play, video scenarios and interactive discussions.

Note: Dangerousness and violence, from a student, faculty or staff member is difficult, if not impossible to accurately predict. This training topic offers research-based techniques and theories to provide a foundational understanding and improved awareness of the potential risk. The training should not be seen as a guarantee or offer any assurance that violence will be prevented.

Training Overview

Morning Part 1: Introduction

  • Identifying an Emergency
  • Types of Emergencies

Morning Part 2: Identifying the Crisis

  • What to look for
  • The biology of a Crisis

Afternoon Part 1: Intervention

  • Motivation, Persuasion and Achieving Compliance
  • Know Thyself
  • Responding to a crisis
  • Referral, Connection, and Documentation

Afternoon Part 2: Addressing the Most Difficult Students

  • Practical Examples and Role-Play
  • Video scenarios
  • Case studies

DANGER TO OTHERS: MANAGEMENT APPROACHES FOR THE BIT

Based on his book in partnership with the American Counseling Association, Harm to Others: The Assessment and Treatment of Dangerousness, Dr. Brian Van Brunt has put together a day-long training for counselors, conduct officers, law enforcement and student affairs administrators to learn the foundational skills needed in order to address at-risk behaviors following a threat assessment.

In 2013, Dr. Van Brunt began offering trainings on the Structured Interview for Violence Risk Assessment (SIVRA-35). This training provides additional guidance on how to manage at-risk students on campus once they have completed a threat assessment and are deemed safe to return.

Management Approaches for the BIT addresses what to do with students once the assessment is complete and they remain on campus.

Training will review:

  • Building rapport and addressing defensiveness
  • Mandated Treatment: What is it and how can we do it well?
  • Communication with the referral source; reducing silos
  • Forming connection and addressing objectification
  • Listening to their story and offering reframing
  • Managing anger and addressing irrational thoughts
  • Using Motivational Interviewing and Change Theory

This one-day training can be tailored to meet the specific needs of the audience. If the training group is made up of exclusively clinical staff, Dr. Van Brunt will focus more on the clinical aspects of mandated treatment and review approaches from humanistic, cognitive-behavioral, Gestalt, existential and narrative therapy perspectives. If the training group is made up of non-clinicians, focus will remain on case management, overcoming resistance, working with defensive students and reducing behaviors in order to stay enrolled at the institution.

The training includes a copy Dr. Van Brunt’s book when released in the summer of 2014 as well as online access to the New Orleans Tapes, a video demonstration of two threat assessment interviews.

The training is useful for schools that have already completed the SIVRA-35 workshop and/or the Danger to Others: Practical Skill Training in Threat Assessment, but is completion of the workshop is not required. A two-day training schedule that includes the SIVRA-35, Checkmate and the Management Approaches to the BIT is available.

Questions about booking this training for your staff can be sent toMe gan Birster, Director of Marketing Outreach & Business Development, at 610-993-0229, ext. 1015.

Note: Dangerousness and violence, from a student, faculty or staff member is difficult, if not impossible to accurately predict. This training topic offers research-based techniques and theories to provide a foundational understanding and improved awareness of the potential risk. The training should not be seen as a guarantee or offer any assurance that violence will be prevented.

Training Overview

Morning Part 1: Introduction and Learning to Listen

  • Establishing the Relationship and Building Rapport
  • Mandated Treatment, Case Management, and Non-clinical Meetings
  • Learning to Listen

Morning Part 2: Understanding Their Story and Thinking Differently

  • Understanding Their Story
  • Learning to Think Differently

Afternoon Part 1: Addressing Change

  • Taking it Step-by-Step
  • Irrational Thoughts and a Cognitive-Behavioral Approach to Change

Afternoon Part 2: Addressing the Most Difficult Students

  • Finding Meaning
  • Case Study
  • Practical Application

DANGER TO OTHERS: PRACTICAL SKILL TRAINING IN THREAT ASSESSMENT

Based on his book in partnership with the American Counseling Association, Harm to Others: The Assessment and Treatment of Dangerousness, Dr. Brian Van Brunt has put together a day-long training for counselors, conduct officers, law enforcement and student affairs administrators to learn the foundational skills needed in order to conduct a threat assessment on a student of concern.

In 2013, Dr. Van Brunt began offering trainings on the Structured Interview for Violence Risk Assessment (SIVRA-35). This training provides additional guidance on how to sit down with the student and conduct the interview.

This advanced training takes staff beyond the knowledge of the SIVRA-35 risk factors, to better explore the foundational and practical skills of:

  • Building rapport with the student
  • Describing the nature of the interview to the student
  • Addressing non-compliance and defensiveness during the interview
  • Overcoming defensiveness and forming trust
  • How to use circular questions to assess key risk factors
  • Working with referral sources to form interview questions
  • Address differences in culture, gender, and diversity
  • Develop treatment plans to guide the next steps
  • Avoid overcommitting to future actions
  • Collecting data into a report back to the referral source

This one-day training will include video demonstrations to highlight interviewing skills, explain concepts and use role-plays to assist participants to improve their efficiency during the interview.

The training includes a copy Dr. Van Brunt’s book as well as online access to the New Orleans Videos, a video demonstration of two threat assessment interviews.

The training is useful for schools that have already completed the SIVRA-35 workshop, but is completion of the workshop is not required. A two-day training schedule that includes the SIVRA-35, Checkmate and the Practical Skill training is available.

Note: Dangerousness and violence, from a student, faculty or staff member is difficult, if not impossible to accurately predict. This training topic offers research-based techniques and theories to provide a foundational understanding and improved awareness of the potential risk. The training should not be seen as a guarantee or offer any assurance that violence will be prevented.

Training Overview

Morning Part 1: Introduction to Threat assessment key principles

  • Paperwork, Communication, and Initial Referral
  • Establishing Relationship/Building Rapport
  • Understanding Dangerousness

Morning Part 2: Threat Concepts

  • Central Threat Concepts
  • Secondary Risk Factors
  • Risk Factors from the Literature

Afternoon Part 1: Video Demonstrations

  • Case Study Stacie
  • Case Study Dustin

Afternoon Part 2: Role Play and Live Demonstrations

  • Live demonstration and partner work with case studies

IDENTIFYING AND REFERRING SUICIDAL STUDENTS: A TRAINING FOR STUDENT LEADERS

This seminar is designed to assist resident advisors in their training process to better understand the mental health concerns of today’s college students. Numerous studies have highlighted the increasing number of today’s college students coming to school with an increasing number of mental health difficulties including depression, anxiety, adjustment problems, and social difficulties.

This seminar will offer training to student leaders in the areas of suicide awareness and referral. Training will offer practical examples of theory and application for the student leaders. The program will also include take-away scenarios to discuss after the classroom experience.

Learning Objectives:

Participants should be able to identify the signs and symptoms of suicide. They will learn the proper way to intervene and refer students to counseling for further assessment.

Participants will learn what questions to ask suicidal students to gather more information and what questions should be avoided when talking with suicidal students.

Participants will learn how to properly refer students to the appropriate offices for treatment and assistance.

Participants will learn the importance of direct questioning, developing a better knowledge of their campus counseling resources and the risk factors associated with suicidal students.


LEGAL ISSUES FOR CAMPUS COUNSELORS AND THERAPISTS

Every campus struggles with questions about what counselors should know, what they should disclose to others, and how should they straddle the sometimes divided loyalties between their employment obligations and their professional ethics. This workshop offers a legal update on pressing issues for campus counselors and therapists, including:

  • Confidentiality of Records;
  • Clarification of FERPA: fact/fiction;
  • Release of information between and among health care providers and HIPAA
  • Administrators and law enforcement;
  • Parental notification;
  • Duty to warn;
  • Documentation of Records;
  • Campus Risk Management;
  • Security and Safety Concerns: Before and During a Crisis.

SIVRA-35 TRAINING

The ideal approach to violence risk assessment is utilizing an individual trained and experienced in violence risk assessment to interview the subject. The Structured Interview for Violence Risk Assessment (SIVRA-35) serves as a starting place for law enforcement, clinical staff and administrators to conduct a more standardized research-based violence risk assessment with individuals determined to be at an increased risk. Discussion of how to score the SIVRA-35 will occur in the context of three practical case studies involving violence in higher education settings. Discussion will be encouraged during this workshop to further explore the utilization of the SIVRA-35 in various research settings. Click here to learn more about the tool and training.


STAY CENTERED – HANDLING DISRUPTIVE PEOPLE (IN YOUR OFFICE/CLASS/HALL)

More and more, front line office staff, residence life staff, and office managers find themselves having to manage unruly students, parents, and visitors in their office environment. Preventing the disruption before it begins is key, but managing difficult people is a learned – not innate – skill. Using proven techniques, the presenter will draw on actual cases from experience managing office environments and training in diffusing difficult situations to teach participants how to prevent and handle these delicate situations by “staying centered.” Our presenter has presented these techniques to over 1,000 managers and supervisors in the corporate and higher education environments, as well as to front line student staff and law enforcement.

Audience:

  • Office Managers
  • Front Line Administrative Support Staff
  • Residence Life Staff
  • Faculty
  • Campus Safety

Learning Outcomes:

Participants will…

  • Gain a perspective on trends in behaviors
  • Be able to utilize methods and strategies to reduce the probability of disruptive behaviors
  • Be able to utilize methods and strategies to respond, react and diffuse disruptive behaviors

Workshop Outline:

  • Introductions
  • Understanding the disruptive person
  • Identifying Behaviors
  • Staying Centered Geographically
  • Staying Centered Physically
  • Staying Centered Emotionally

STUDENT SUICIDE: WHAT COLLEGE AND UNIVERSITY ADMINISTRATORS NEED TO KNOW ABOUT THE LAW AND BEST PRACTICES

Yes, you can separate a suicidal student. Don’t believe the myths. College and university administrators are all trying to find the right balance for managing the risk of suicidal students while doing the utmost to support them. We are grappling with tough questions, and this workshop gives you fresh thinking and creative strategies for exploring the best practices for suicidal students that are emerging in our field. From questions of approaching suicidality as a conduct violation to the merits of involuntary medical withdrawal procedures, this workshop is comprehensive. It will address the “direct threat” test mandated by ADA and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act. Re-entry will be discussed as will suicidality as a disability, pretext issues, and what are reasonable accommodations. Mandated assessment and behavioral intervention models will also be reviewed. HIPAA, FERPA and confidentiality limits as they pertain to crisis and recent wrongful death cases against colleges for suicides will be explored.


STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES & EMOTIONAL CHALLENGES—BEST PRACTICES FOR TOUGH TIMES

The writing is on the wall. College administrators know that in the next ten years, this will be one of the toughest issues colleges face. ADA and 504 litigation abounds, and the Office for Civil Rights has now decided that it’s not enough to treat a disabled student fairly, it’s more a matter of how you treat them fairly (Guilford College Decision, 2002). From classroom disruption to overbooked counseling centers to suicidal students to conduct offices that are asked to make exceptions for a student’s disability, colleges are facing a crisis. Out of this morass, certain best practices are emerging, as ever more complex questions are arising. This workshop helps college administrators to understand what is coming, and to plan today for the issues colleges will face tomorrow.


SUICIDE GATEKEEPING & MENTAL HEALTH AWARENESS FOR THE RESIDENT ADVISOR

This seminar is designed to assist resident advisors in their training process to better understand the mental health concerns of today’s college students. Numerous studies have highlighted the increasing number of today’s college students coming to school with an increasing number of mental health difficulties including depression, anxiety, adjustment problems, and social difficulties.

This seminar will offer training to future and returning RA’s in the areas of suicide awareness and referral, an overview of various mental health concerns experienced by college students (depression, anxiety, adjustment problems, learning difficulties, substance abuse, eating disorders and social difficulties).

This training will offer practical examples of theory and application for the RA’s, will include testing and certification. The program will also include take-away scenarios to discuss after the classroom experience.

Many schools offer some version of RA training that discusses mental health and suicide concerns of the incoming class. Some of these trainings involve connections with counseling departments on campus, some involve resident directors reading up and teaching on mental health concerns. This program offers a succinct summary of the mental health concerns common to incoming students in both residential and community college scenarios. The training is research-based and provides schools with documentation and certification that their residential life staff has been trained in key areas of mental health and suicide prevention.

Learning Objectives:

RA’s will be able to identify key risk-factors associated with depression, anxiety, adjustment disorders, learning disorders, personality disorders, social problems, and eating disorders.

RA’s will learn how to approach students with these difficulties and work towards improving communications with them. Special focus will include those with difficult personality disorders such as antisocial, dependant, and borderline.

RA’s will learn how to properly refer students to the appropriate offices for treatment and assistance.

RA’s will learn how to identify the signs and symptoms of suicide. They will learn the proper way to intervene and refer students to counseling for further assessment.

RA’s will learn ways to address students who are abusing substances, including the importance of intervention, reporting and not leaving them unattended.


WATCHING THE TRAIN DERAIL: A PROGRAM ON STUDENT SUICIDE, THREATENING BEHAVIOR AND BYSTANDER INTERVENTION

“If I kill them and myself, will they stop following me?”

These words, scrawled across a test that was turned in to a professor, started a chain of events that culminated in spending 6 hours in an apartment negotiating a potential active shooter crisis with a very disturbed student. What was more disturbing was what I learned in the follow-up investigation: that a number of people, students, staff and faculty alike, had seen behaviors that were, at the very least, concerning – but no one said anything.

I saw the same pattern emerge in the death of a student from alcohol abuse, where others were injured as well. Unfortunately, these situations are not isolated to the college environment, and our students will continue to face them after they enter the workforce. Teaching them the skills and confidence to intervene will serve them beyond graduation.

In this engaging and interactive program, students (and staff and faculty) will be asked to answer questions about disturbing behaviors that they have seen and people they may know who may pose a threat of harm to themselves or the campus community

Questions such as:

  • Do you know someone you would never want to be alone with late at night?
  • Do you have a friend who you are concerned about? Why?
  • Do you have a friend who you won’t drink with?
  • What keeps you from saying something to someone?

In this program, the presenter challenges students to reconsider their notions of responsibility for their fellow students and their community. It teaches early warning signs, intervention techniques, and what to do with a situation that gets complicated quickly.

  • Mental Health or Behavioral Concerns – this is a valuable support tool to your Behavioral Intervention Team
  • High-Risk Drinking or Drug Use – This version can be presented to large groups, but is generally more effective with smaller audiences. It can also be done for targeted student leaders to assist in changing campus cultures through peer education.
  • Student Suicide – Risk Factors, Gatekeeping, and Support

For more details, contact Nicole Pasquini, Director of Client Relations, at nicole.pasquini@tngconsulting.com.