11th Annual NaBITA Conference

November 11–13, 2019
Hyatt Regency Coconut Point Resort & Spa
in Bonita Springs, FL

Please contact NaBITA at conference@nabita.org for questions. 

Please Note: NaBITA does not work with any Hotel Travel Agencies. Reservations for hotel accommodations should be made with the hotel directly. 


Call for ProposalsConference Sponsors and Exhibitors | Conference ScheduleConference Speakers 

Conference Registration | Pre- and Post-Conference Opportunities | Scholarships | Roundtable Discussions

Awards | Hotel & Conference Location | NaBITA Policies | Contact the Conference Committee


The Annual NaBITA Conference is the leading conference in the field of higher education threat assessment and behavioral intervention. Since our first Conference in 2009, we have provided a space for valuable, sustaining dialogue for professionals from various disciplines who are engaged in the essential function of behavioral intervention in schools, on college campuses, and in corporations and organizations.


Call for Proposals

The NaBITA Conference concurrent sessions will be held Tuesday, November 12th &  Wednesday, November 13th, 2019 in Bonita Springs, FL.

Concurrent Sessions

  • Concurrent sessions are 75 minutes long
  • We are seeking concurrent sessions which present information in the following areas:
    • BIT/CARE Team best practices
    • Innovative practices or programs
    • Research related to BIT/CARE Teams
    • Assessment or interventions related to specialized populations
    • Threat, crisis, or violence prevention, assessment, or intervention best practices
    • Model mental health support or case management practices
  • Selections will be based on the following criteria:
    • Relevance to the topics of behavioral intervention, mental health, violence prevention, threat assessment, model programs, and case management
    • Completeness, detail, and professionalism of the proposal
    • Evidence‐based, promising, and innovative model programs/practices are welcome
    • Engaging format, presenters, and/or concepts
  • You are encouraged to submit multiple proposals
  • If your program is selected, the presentation abstract provided in the application will be included on the conference site and the printed conference program. Please make sure the abstract clearly conveys the objective, theme, and style of the presentation.

Call for Proposals were closed on Friday, August 2, 2019. Submitters were notified by email on Wednesday, August 14th, 2019.

Session Snapshots

  • Session snapshots will allow presenters the opportunity to give a brief, 10 minute overview of an innovative program or practice at their institution.
  • The entire session snapshot block is 90 minutes long, and the accepted session snapshot presenters will rotate, each presenting for 10 minutes.
  • The session snapshots are designed to highlight an innovative program or practice, and provide participants with key takeaways which they can apply to their own campuses.
  • We are seeking session snapshots which describe an innovate program or practice related to BIT/Care Teams, case management, threat assessment, mental health, or interventions and support.
  • If your program is selected, the presentation abstract provided in the application will be included on the conference site and the printed conference program. Please make sure the abstract clearly conveys the objective, theme and style of the presentation.

Call for Proposals were closed on Friday, August 2, 2019. Submitters were notified by email on Wednesday, August 14th, 2019.


Conference Sponsors and Exhibitors

2019 Sponsors | 2019 Exhibitors | Become a Sponsor and/or Exhibitor

2019 Sponsors

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2019 Exhibitors


Become a Sponsor and Exhibitor

Thank you for your interest in becoming a conference sponsor and/or exhibitor. Take advantage of this unique opportunity to get your brand and/or services in front of more than 500 behavioral intervention team members and campus practitioners as they come together in common purpose and exploration of best practices for campus safety.

Please click here to be directed to the Sponsor and Exhibitor Application 

The Sponsor and Exhibitor application deadline is Friday, September 13th, 2019! Please review our Sponsor and Exhibitor Brochure for information on sponsoring levels and exhibit schedule.

Email our team at conference@nabita.org for interest and inquiry next steps and we will evaluate each additional opportunity request on a case-by-case basis post application closure.


Conference Schedule

Please click here to register online.
Please click here to register by cheque.
Extended Registration Rates (Register after Monday, October 28th, 2019)
  • NaBITA Member: $699
  • Non-NaBITA Member: $799

The conference will begin the evening of Monday, November 11th with an opening keynote and welcome reception. Tuesday, November 12th will include a variety of concurrent and featured sessions, as well as roundtables and optional events, such as receptions. The conference will conclude with another featured session and mid-morning closing keynote on Wednesday, November 13th.

Pre-conference opportunities will be available Sunday, November 10th & Monday, November 11th; additional fees apply. Post-conference opportunities will be available Wednesday, November 13th-Friday, November 15th; additional fees apply.

Conference Schedule

  • Monday, November 11, 2019

5:15pm – 6:30pm    Welcome Session: Welcome First Time NaBITA Attendees/New BIT Members

6:45pm – 8:30pm   Welcome & Opening Keynote: Interventions with Individuals in Crisis and Crisis Communications

  • Tuesday, November 12, 2019

8:30am – 10:00am    Featured Speaker Session A

10:15am – 11:30am    Concurrent Speaker Session 1                                 

1:00pm – 2:15pm    Concurrent Speaker Session 2

2:30pm – 3:30pm    Roundtable Discussions

4:00pm – 5:30pm    Featured Speaker Session B

  • Wednesday, November 13, 2019

8:30am – 10:00am    Featured Speaker Session C

10:15am – 11:30am    Concurrent Speaker Session 3

11:45am – 2:00pm    Closing Keynote: Cultural Responsiveness in Challenging Times: Uplifting the Agency, Grit, and Behavior of Students and Professionals

Conference Attire

Attire for all NaBITA events is business casual. Rooms are air-conditioned and can be chilling in the mornings especially. Average temperatures for Bonita Springs in November range from 63°F to 81°F.


Conference Speakers

Please note that speakers do not necessarily represent the viewpoints of NaBITA leadership and may present controversial material.

Opening Keynote | Closing Keynote | Featured Speakers

Opening Keynote

Interventions with Individuals in Crisis and Crisis Communications
Kevin R. Briggs, Sergeant, California Highway Patrol, Ret.

Every year in the United States there is an ever-increasing number of suicides. In 2017 the number of individuals who lost their life to suicide was over 47,000.  This surpasses homicides (17,284) and vehicle traffic fatalities (40,100) in this country.

By learning the signs that an individual may be contemplating suicide, and how to effectively communicate with that individual, there is a much greater chance of preventing a suicide. Utilizing active listening skills, focusing on listening, normalization and validation, it is suggested the number of those contemplating suicide can be reduced.

Kevin Briggs, while employed as a California Highway Patrol Officer from 1990-2013, spoke to well over 200 individuals contemplating suicide by leaping from the Golden Gate Bridge. Briggs will present on how he helped the vast majority change their thoughts about suicide.

Closing Keynote

Cultural Responsiveness in Challenging Times: Uplifting the Agency, Grit, and Behavior of Students and Professionals
Anindya Kundu, Ph.D., Senior Fellow at the City University of New York

Dr. Anindya Kundu is excited to provide attendees with a primer on the concepts of agency and grit to uplift the behavior of our student and professional stakeholders. A sociologist by training, Anindya brings the lens that behavior is largely a product of one’s environment and many external factors; however, as interveners and mentors, there is much we can do to improve our surroundings and mindsets, as well as those of people around us. Dr. Kundu is also excited to share segments from his continued research on the success of students from very challenging backgrounds, highlighting how basic cultural responsiveness can be incorporated in various contexts to help others navigate the many, difficult obstacles in their lives. Dr. Kundu will discuss the types of social supports that can help all individuals grow their agency and grit, reminding us that teaching, learning, and cultivating relationships are collective responsibilities. Attendees will leave with takeaways for playing a more active role in the development of others.


Featured Speakers

The 11th Annual NaBITA Conference features presenters chosen for their topical expertise by the conference committee. The conference committee also invites those with promising models, valuable experience and professional expertise to share your knowledge in our concurrent sessions.

Suicidal Students on Campus: Liability Management and Behavioral Intervention Teams
Carolyn Reinach Wolf, J.D., Executive Partner and Director of the Mental Health Law Practice, Abrams, Fensterman, Fensterman, Eisman, Formato, Ferrara, Wolf & Carone, LLP and NaBITA Past-President and Amy Murphy, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Angelo State University; NaBITA President

When it comes to managing suicidal students on campus, there are numerous legal, policy and confidentiality questions, among others. Due to the high volume of attendees and positive response to similar sessions on this topic at previous conferences, this Featured Session is a review and continuation of those programs. This session will cover the issue of the legal liability of the college/university for a student’s suicide including an analysis of the “special relationship” requirement using case studies and case law. We will examine recent case law across the country where courts decide whether a university and/or its agents can be held liable for the student’s suicide. As suicide rates are rising, especially among special student populations, it is more important than ever to ensure that the college campus and its members are aware of their role and responsibilities when it comes to student suicide. We will explore the role of Behavioral Intervention Teams and review federal laws (ADA, FERPA, HIPAA, etc.) as they relate to student suicide. Lastly, we will review risk management practices such as parental notification and suicide prevention protocols.

BIT and Section 504/ADA
Saundra K. Schuster, J.D., Partner, TNG and NaBITA Past-President 

Public and private colleges are subject to oversight by the courts and OCR for disability-related discrimination. Students with mental health issues often exhibit behavior that creates concerns and are reported to your BIT. Stu- dents with mental health issues are likely to have a qualifying disability either by diagnosis and documentation, or by our regarding the student as such. In these cases, the student is protected by both 504 of the Rehabilitation Act and ADA. This session addresses the requirements and contours of disability issues as it impacts your BIT and the student conduct process. This program explores the legal and best practice implications of the Section 504 Direct Threat standard and the way in which it impacts BIT-based decisions. It will also address the philosophical implications of separating versus retaining students who have actual mental health and or disability conditions.

The Role of the Counselor on the BIT
Brian Van Brunt, Ed.D., Executive Director, NaBITA and NaBITA Past-President; W. Scott Lewis, J.D., Partner, TNG and NaBITA Past-President; and Erin Halligan-Avery, Ph.D., Director, Wellness Programs and Service, Rochester Institute of Technology

The expertise and experience of a counselor on the BIT is critical to the team’s efficiency and ability to connect students with support. This program is designed to identify the types of counselors that exist in higher education, how and when counselors can share information, and the appropriateness of sharing health-related notes. This program will identify strategies associated with effective BIT participation by counselors, specifically addressing concerns related to confidentiality. The program outline will focus on presenting information for group discussions, case examples, and opportunities to identify areas for your BIT’s improvement.

Overcoming Bias in BIT Data Gathering and Assessment
Brian Van Brunt, Ed.D., Executive Director, NaBITA and NaBITA Past-President and Tanyka M. Barber, J.D., Associate, TNG

Everyone has some level of prejudice and bias.   The key is to recognize it and take steps to mitigate its impact on your BIT. This session will help participants explore their own level of cultural competency and bias from a personal and broad perspective.  This session will also discuss ways to mitigate its impact on BIT data gathering, assessment and team dynamics.

Session Snapshots
Moderated by
 Brian Van Brunt, Ed.D., Executive Director, NaBITA and NaBITA Past-President and Amy Murphy, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Angelo State University; NaBITA President

This session will allow presenters the opportunity to give a brief 10-minute overview of their ideas and research to session attendees. This session will be shared between several presentations, rotating through each group as they provide a snapshot within a 10-minute allotted timeframe. Session topics include:

  • From Reactive to Preventive: Destigmatizing and Normalizing Mental Health Services
    Lori Gonzalez, Ph.D., Vice Chancellor, Academic, Faculty, and Student Affairs, University of Tennessee Health Science Center; Kimberly Williams-Collins, Ph.D., HSP, Counseling Psychologist, University Health Services, University of Tennessee Health Science Center; Darrilynn Todd, Ed.D., Associate Vice Chancellor, Enrollment Services, University of Tennessee Health Science Center; Rachel Bolick, LCSW, CARE Navigator, Student Academic Support Services and Inclusion, University of Tennessee Health Science Center; Kathy Gibbs, M.S., M.Ed., NCC, BCC, UTHSC, Assistant Vice Chancellor, Student Academic Support Services and Inclusion, University of Tennessee Health Science CenterHealth Science students can be hesitant to seek academic and mental health support due to the stigma that a healer or future healthcare provider should not need healing. Important aspects for consideration when developing mental health services for students in high-stakes and stressful environments include determining an integrative model of assessment, evaluation and treatment, as well as identifying campus needs. The goal is to create and promote preventive services and support for all students even those who have never sought treatment. This presentation describes the process used at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center to assess its mental health counseling services and develop an integrative model for service delivery with a focus on prevention. Assessments from consultants at TNG/NaBITA as well as the JED Foundation shed light on preventive programming and service gaps to guide the campus in creating positions and mechanisms to close the gaps in mental health services.
  • From Concept to Creation: Rolling out a CARE Team Through the Support of a SAMHSA Grant
    Dr. J.B. Robinson, Ph.D., Associate Director of Accessibility & Wellness, National University; Ashley Maakesta, MSW, Assistant Manager, Student Wellness, National University; Joseph Allen, Ed.D., Director of Community College Pathways, National University Come and learn how a multi-site/primarily online institution developed their first CARE Team with the support of a SAMHSA Grant. We will discuss the grant application, goals, and objectives, as well as the initial results of implementation.
  • Activating the Campus Community
    Steven Yeagley, M.S., Associate Dean of Students, Crisis Management, Purdue University; Juanita Richey, M.A., Student Support Specialist, Crisis Management, Purdue University This Session Snapshot will focus on BITs process on educating the campus community on how to recognize and report students of concern. Attendees will walk away with a copy of our publications and an understanding of our process for getting materials into the learning community. The presenters serve on the team that developed the publications for use on Purdue’s campus.

The NaBITA Risk Rubric and BIT Process
Saundra K. Schuster, J.D., Partner, TNG and NaBITA Past-President; W. Scott Lewis, J.D., Partner, TNG and NaBITA Past-President; Makenzie Schiemann, M.S., Associate Executive Director, NaBITA and Associate Consultant, TNG; and Jamie Molnar, LMHC, Licensed Psychotherapist and Higher Education Consultant

The NaBITA Risk Rubric has enjoyed broad acceptance at hundreds of schools with thousands of staff members. First created in 2009 and updated in 2014, the newly revised Risk Rubric has increased clarity around the various scales and interventions, broader depth of research support for D-Scale items, affective violence, mental health, and environmental stress, as well as a focus on low level referrals and early intervention efforts.  Join us for a discussion of BIT foundational issues and review of the new changes to the NaBITA Risk Rubric. The presenters will also assist participants in applying this tool to triaging risk and moving towards consistent and appropriate interventions.

The Intersection of BIT and Title IX
Daniel C. Swinton, J.D., Ed.D., President, TNG and NaBITA Past-President and Makenzie Schiemann, M.S., Associate Executive Director, NaBITA and Associate Consultant, TNG

There is obvious intersection between sexual assault and BIT, as well as any other type of harassment or bullying. But where is the formal intersection? Should the Title IX Coordinator be on the BIT? What about the Deputy Coordinator? If they are in some other capacity, how should they manage the many roles? This session will address these intersections and other issues surrounding core and inner circle membership on a BIT.

The Art of Engagement: Using Motivational Interviewing During Challenging Student Conversations
Robert Scholz, MA, LMFT, LPCC, The Change Place, Psychotherapy, Training and Consulting

Effective decision-making for BIT and Threat Management Teams depends on a variety of factors, including the quality of the information gained from interviews with at-risk students.  Even the most experienced professional can be challenged during these conversations since students often enter these interactions guarded, angry, hopeless and fearing for the worst. Motivational interviewing (MI) offers professionals a practical, common sense style to engage students in difficult conversations through a caring, empathic and collaborative approach. This program will offer participants a brief overview of MI theory and principles,  specific early interview MI engagement strategies, skills to respond more effectively to the reactive student, and ideas for structuring interviews that both elicit needed information, while also respecting the student’s readiness to move into more difficult topics.

Case Management in Practice
Saundra K. Schuster, J.D., Partner, TNG and NaBITA Past-President; Makenzie Schiemann, M.S., Associate Executive Director, NaBITA and Associate Consultant, TNG; and Jamie Molnar, LMHC, Licensed Psychotherapist and Higher Education Consultant

Ever wonder what case management looks like in action? Join NaBITA’s leaders on case management as they provide practical skills and techniques for implementing case management services. This session will deliver an overview of high-impact case management practices as well as key strategies for working with specific student population. Using an interactive format, participants will watch video demonstrations of case management services in action and then engage in discussion with the presenters and fellow participants regarding the skills and techniques demonstrated in the video.


Concurrent Speakers

Concurrent Session 1

Keynote Q&A: Interventions with Individuals in Crisis and Crisis Communications
Kevin Briggs

  • This session will allow participants to ask questions as a follow-up to the Monday evening keynote. The format will be mostly Q&A, with time available to go into much more depth in areas of interest to participants.

Leadership and the BIT
Makenzie Schiemann, M.S., Associate Executive Director, NaBITA and Associate Consultant, TNG
Amy Murphy, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Angelo State University; NaBITA President
Jamie Molnar, LMHC, Licensed Psychotherapist and Higher Education Consultant

  • Chairing and leading a BIT is demanding work. From the day-to-day processes of the BIT to the long-term development and training of team members, the BIT chair is charged with facilitating team communication and participation, navigating team conflict and bias, transitioning and training team members, managing BIT burnout, and gaining support and resources for the team. This session will explore the common challenges BIT chairs face when leading their teams and provide practical techniques and resources for meeting the demands of today’s BIT.

A Foster Youth Primer for BIT & CARE Teams
Poppy Fitch, Ed.D., Associate Vice President, ADA/Title IX Coordinator, Ashford University

  • As institutions increase their focus on serving the needs of the foster youth on their campuses, the postsecondary outcomes of college students who are foster youth continue to paint a compelling and troubling picture. The focus of this presentation will be to provide BIT/CARE team members an overview of contemporary foster youth research, explore promising practices in serving them as they navigate higher education, and evaluate campus strengths and opportunities in serving foster youth through the BIT/CARE lens.Participants will engage in a review of contemporary research on college students who are foster youth, be introduced to an emerging framework for supporting the success of foster youth on your campus, and discuss the strengths and opportunities to improve service to foster youth through the lens of BIT and CARE Teams.

Reasons Behind Radicalization: The Psychology of Homegrown Violent Extremists
Peter Langman, Ph.D., Psychologist, Langman Psychological Associates, LLC

  • Terrorists are often seen as ordinary people (i.e., without psychological disturbance) who become radicalized to a cause as a result of external circumstances. This presentation challenges that view by demonstrating the range of psychological disturbances found in violent extremists and exploring the personal dynamics that drive their radicalization. Like other types of mass attackers, violent extremists tend to be either psychopathic, psychotic, or traumatized, and their motivation for violence is often a result of a damaged sense of self and a desire for power and fame. Recognizing these disturbances and dynamics can enhance threat assessment and intervention efforts.

Postvention: Suicide on Campus and What’s Essential
David J. Denino, LPC, NCC, Director Emeritus, Counseling Services, Adjunct Professor, Clinical Mental Health Program, Southern Connecticut State University and Past-President, NaBITA

  • This program will explore the critical role of postvention planning and implementation using an example of a campus impacted by six suicides in a short time frame. Participants will be able to create an active plan for postvention on their campus and describe the connection between postvention and prevention planning. This session will help attendees to become familiar with the stages of suicide postvention, create an active plan for postvention activities, and increase the level of knowledge as to how you can create or enhance suicide postvention programs on your campus.

Verbal De-Escalation: An Important Skill Needed in Working With Emotionally Charged Students
Joseph Contes, M.S. NCC, Assistant Director, Student Outreach and Support, SOCAT Chair, University of South Florida St. Petersburg

  • Threat assessment teams are tasked with managing the veracity of perceived threats with actual threatening actions and/or assessing concerning behaviors. Some team members, oftentimes case managers, are tasked with meeting with the potentially dangerous student. Neurocognitive abilities like executive functioning, such as the ability to distinguish between right and wrong, decreases during emotional distress or perceived trauma. It is imperative to provide student support professionals with the techniques to adequately and appropriately respond to the level of support needed by the student in distress. This training is intended for all professionals that interact with students that land on the Elevated or Critical on the D or E scale of the NaBITA Risk Rubric.

Concurrent Session 2

Activating the Emergency Contact: Making the Most of the Call Home
Steven Yeagley, M.S., Associate Dean of Students, Crisis Management, Purdue University
Juanita Richey, M.A., Student Support Specialist, Crisis Management, Purdue University

  • This session will focus on emergency contact notification as a beneficial intervention strategy used by behavioral intervention teams. Instead of a focus on when to contact, primary attention will be given to methods of including students in the process, content of conversations with the emergency contacts, and examples of the ongoing partnership between the university and families in supporting their students. The presenters serve on Purdue University’s behavioral intervention team, which completed approximately 200 of these notifications during the 2018-19 academic year. 

BITs Supporting Faculty in Their New Role: Identifying & Referring Distressed Students
Eileen Daniel, D.Ed, Vice Provost for Academic Affairs, SUNY Brockport
Karen Logsdon, Ph.D., Assistant to the Vice President for Enrollment Management, SUNY Brockport
Darlene Schmitt, M.S.Ed., LMHC, Associate Director of the Counseling Center, SUNY Brockport

  • The role of faculty has been well defined for many years: teaching, advising, service and research. However, a new role is emerging, that of identifying students that are struggling not only academically but personally and emotionally. While faculty are well versed in their academic discipline, they don’t typically know much about mental health or other issues that can undermine their students’ ability to succeed in college (White & LaBelle, 2019). Also, some faculty believe their job is to weed out students who are unable to cope, while others, however, are moving into a more supportive role (Marcus, 2018). Doing this requires faculty to know how to identify students in need and appropriately refer them or otherwise provide help and support. Faculty are often in a position to recognize students who are struggling and are often the first to recognize changes in a student’s behavior. Thus, colleges and universities need to offer training and support to faculty in this new role. As student demographics change with more students entering college with mental health and personal issues (Gulliver, et al., 2018), BITs can play an important role in teaching, training and aiding their faculty colleagues. This session includes an interactive discussion on effective strategies to educate and support faculty including the insight from a seasoned faculty member.

Conflict Resolution and Active Listening Skills
David J. Denino, LPC, NCC, Director Emeritus, Counseling Services, Adjunct Professor, Clinical Mental Health Program, Southern Connecticut State University and NaBITA Past-President
Chris Brown, Consultant, DPREP, Inc.

  • This program will explore how you can personally manage conflict when dealing with persons that exhibit disruptive or dangerous behavior and improving your active listening skills. Participants will be able to personalize their skill set when dealing with difficult people, improve de-escalation techniques, provide a “win-win” scenario while calming potential conflicts, and expand active listening skills. This session will review the guiding principles for conflict resolution, increase familiarity with the positive vs. negative consequences of conflict, and teach attendees about the seven steps of conflict resolution.

Meeting Food and Housing Insecurity Needs at Two Very Different Institutions
Lynn Schoenberg, Ed.S., Dean of Students, Stetson University
Ben Falter, M.S., Senior Student Affairs Case Manager, San Jose State University

  • A Temple University study found that 36% of students at 66 surveyed institutions struggle with food and housing insecurity. This impacts students’ most basic of Maslow’s hierarchy of needs, and how universities tackle this complex issue varies greatly. Simply put, students who don’t have sufficient food or housing are experiencing college with additional levels of stress and anxiety, oftentimes discovered by BITs when it’s too late. Learn from staff who are supporting this work at a large urban state institution of over 35,000 students, in an area of excessive cost of living inflation, as well as staff from a private residential university of 3,200 students. A focus of this session will be learning from each other about how to support our students’ basic needs, allowing them to engage academically while managing the psychosocial, physical, and mental health stressors exasperated by not having stable food and/or housing.

Evolution of a BIT – How CSU’s BIT Has Gone from Threat Assessment Committee (TAC) to Behavioral Assessment and Recommendation Team (BART) to Create Care
Aaron (Chip) Reese, Ed.D., Associate Vice President for Student Affairs, Columbus State University
John McElveen, M.A., Associate Vice President for Student Affairs and Dean of Students, Columbus State University 

  • Has your approach to BIT evolved to meet the ever-changing challenges of campus safety and supporting student success? Columbus State University has long been an active part of the BIT landscape and has adapted to challenges old and new. The presenters will demonstrate how the University’s approach has evolved over time from strictly threat assessment to the latest iteration, the University’s care network, “Create Care CSU!” The presenters will discuss the role of the CSU Create Care Team in coordinating numerous internal and external resources in support of a safe campus environment and student success. Additionally, the presenters will discuss how a graphic model of the care network is being used to increase awareness and usage of “Create Care CSU!” across all campus communities. 

Preventing the Next School Shooting: Knee-Jerk Legislation and Overreaching School Policies
Carolyn Reinach Wolf, J.D., Executive Partner and Director of the Mental Health Law Practice, Abrams, Fensterman, Fensterman, Eisman, Formato, Ferrara, Wolf & Carone, LLP and NaBITA Past-President
Jamie Rosen, J.D., Associate Attorney of the Mental Health Law Practice, Abrams, Fensterman, Fensterman, Eisman, Formato, Ferrara, Wolf & Carone, LLP

  • In the wake of increasing school shootings lawmakers across the country have been searching for ways to make our schools, college campuses and communities safer and prevent future violence. Unfortunately, many of these programs or policies do not translate into meaningful change, but rather lack focus on the bigger picture. This session will cover the various types of legislation being proposed and/or passed across the country in an attempt to combat gun violence. This includes, but is not limited to, “Red Flag” bills, gun control bills, school safety policies such as providing guns to teachers, cell phone applications for emergency messaging, and removing guns from mentally ill individuals. We will discuss some of these as “knee-jerk” reactions and others as a step in the right direction toward preventing the next tragedy. We will also explore the use of BIT teams for early identification and intervention of students or members of the larger college community that may be at risk for violence as well as legal issues related to sharing information.

Concurrent Session 3

BIT by BIT: Developing a K-12 Public School Team
Esther Asbell, C.A.G.S., Associate Superintendent, SAU 16
Lauren McGrath, C.A.G.S., Assistant Principal, Cooperative Middle School
Catherine Clermont, M.Ed., Assistant Principal, Exeter High School
Lisa Sloan, M.A., MLADC, School Counselor, Exeter High School
Amanda Bibeau, B.S., Resource Officer, Cooperative Middle School; Stratham Police Department
Richard Kane, B.S., Director of School Safety, SAU 16
Sonya Robicheau, A.S., School Resource Officer, Exeter High School; Exeter Police Department
Sonya Roche, C.A.G.S., Director of Special Education, Cooperative Middle School

  • This session is designed to provide participants with the skills and knowledge to develop a behavioral intervention team in the K-12 setting. Using the NaBITA Standards for Behavioral Intervention Teams, participants will learn and discuss essential components and skills needed for K-12 BIT implementation. There will be a particular emphasis on the nuances of developing a BIT in the public-school setting, including developing a district-wide rationale and garnering district-wide support, K-12-specific team membership, key foundational considerations, and team scope. Participants will understand the challenges and benefits of developing a K-12 BIT through an interactive review of an actual case study. Participants will have access to K-12-specific resources and will develop action steps specific to their school/ district’s individual needs.

Active Lockdown Options v. Traditional Lockdown: Centennials v. Millennials
Lisa Pescara-Kovach, Ph.D., Director, Center for Mass Violence and Suicide; Chair, Mass Violence Task Force; Associate Professor of Educational Psychology, The University of Toledo
Chris Brown, Consultant, DPREP, Inc.

  • Centennials, also known as Gen Z (born between 1995 and 2012), think quite differently than those before them. They are more self-reliant, driven, and technologically savvy than previous generations. The aforementioned characteristics are empowering, yet Gen Z is also a generation that is significantly stressed, with 75% reporting mass shootings and 72% reporting school shootings as major sources of stress (American Psychological Association, 2018). By nature of being raised with the increasing availability of technology, and the related 24/7 news cycle, many have witnessed livestreams of same-age peers being injured or dying in targeted, rampage, and mass shootings. They are the post-Columbine era that has either been trained and prepared using passive “sit and wait” lockdown or active (e.g., Alert, Lockdown, Counter, Evacuate (ALICE); Run, Hide, Fight) responses to an active shooter. Given the aforementioned traits and fears, it is important to allow these youth to decide how they wish to prepare and respond. Such decisions are best made by those whose lives are most at stake. Yet, as of late, Millenials (born 1977 to 1994) are debating the fate of Gen Z in relation to active shootings. Recent active shootings were ended by active approaches, but at the cost of the lives of the individuals who countered/fought the gunmen. Highland Ranch STEM School and the University of North Carolina shooters were apprehended by students who were shot while attempting to neutralize the shooters. These events have raised the attention of previous generations who do not condone risking one’s own life through active responses. While training Gen Z, it is key to recognize they are less conservative than Baby Boomers (1946 to 1964), as rebellious as some Gen Xers (1965 to 1976), and as informed as, but more politically active than, Gen Y (1977 to 1994). This session will describe the stressors and safety needs identified by Gen Z in relation to shootings and similar attacks.  After all, this “school shooting generation” deserves a say in their own fate.

Cuidado…Our CARE Team’s Approach to Supporting Hispanic Students
Jami Hall, Ed.D., Dean of Students, Dalton State College
Andrea Roberson, M.P.A, Associate Director for Disability Access and Student Support Services, Dalton State College
Elizabeth Hutchins, M.S, Director of Advising, Dalton State College
Jenny Guy, LPC-MHSP, Associate Director of Counseling Services, Dalton State College

  • As Georgia’s first Hispanic Serving Institution (HSI), Dalton State College has the fortune to learn how to best support and develop this unique population of students. The culture of the Hispanic community is distinct, and they experience social and family dynamics that many of us have limited knowledge or understanding about. In this session, we will share our experiences of assisting the students who are referred through our CARE Team process, what we have learned from our students, their families, and our colleagues, including how our interventions and support have and have not worked. You will walk away with tangible information to improve the strategies on your own campus and expand your knowledge base about the fastest growing population in the United States.

Helping the Helpers: Establishing Peer Support Services
Raquelle Solon, Business Solutions Engineer, FEI Behavioral Health

  • Whether in a school or on campus, the emotional, behavioral and physical energy needed when helping students who require interventions can sometimes lead to unhealthy amounts of stress and burnout in those providing support. Attendees will discuss how to develop a program for helping their teams via staff peer support services. Taking into consideration the unique needs of educators, student workers and interventionists, we’ll review how building a resilient staff enables better outcomes, lessens the effects of compassion fatigue and vicarious trauma, and nullifies concerns of “outsiders” who don’t understand the challenges present in educational environments.

Care Coordination on College Campuses: Tools and Techniques for Coordinating Support for Students in Distress
Rani Sinno, M.A., Case Manager, University of South Florida St. Petersburg
Joseph Contes, M.S., NCC, Assistant Director, University of South Florida St. Petersburg

  • There are many varying clinical and non-clinical case management models available today. Which model is best for higher education case managers? Care coordination is a growing trend in case management within healthcare field; however, has many applicable benefits to support students in distress.  The care coordination process is intended to promote self-efficacy and place the student in the driver seat with the case manager serving as the co-pilot assisting the student learn ways to mitigate future distress. This session is intended for developing and mid-level BIT or case management teams building or seeking to improve and refine their practice. Attendees will be exposed to various case management models and key conceptual takeaways to adapt and utilize within their BIT and case management teams.

Care and Conduct Conversations: Similar Discussions of Concern, Education, and Support
Laura Ulmer, Ph.D., Director of Student Conduct & Academic Integrity, Old Dominion University
Erin Halligan-Avery, Ph.D., Director, Wellness Programs and Service, Rochester Institute of Technology

  • Generally, students managing mental health issues may be involved in conduct-related processes in two ways: as students of concern allegedly engaging in inappropriate behaviors, and as reporting parties of incidents of harassment and assault. Conduct officers, Title IX investigators, and Behavioral Intervention/Care Teams struggle to provide equitable and fair conduct processes while also dealing with aspects of the student’s struggle with mental health problems. From minor depression and anxiety, to increasingly severe disorders, our ability to communicate, build rapport, apply policy, and gather information about incidents can be hindered when students are also struggling with mental health. As more students enroll in college with mental health concerns, behavioral issues arise with these students that may or may not stem from problems with mental health. Colleges may feel compelled to lower academic and behavioral standards because the student is experiencing mental health difficulties. Unfortunately, far too often, the behaviors continue, and the institution has now enabled a pattern of misbehavior that becomes increasingly difficult to manage because they fell out of alignment with established policy and standards. In many of these cases, the student is also protected under ADA from discrimination on the basis of disability. Some colleges may err on the other end of the spectrum and fail to provide the reasonable accommodations related to policies or practice required for the student with a disability. This presentation explores the complexities of mental health and conduct processes, focusing on both aspects of reporting and responding parties managing mental health problems.

Conference Registration

Download W9 | Registration Policies

Conference Registration Rates

Please click here to register online.
Please click here to register by cheque.
Extended Registration Rates (Register after Monday, October 28th, 2019)
  • NaBITA Member: $699
  • Non-NaBITA Member: $799

Conference registration fee includes the attendee welcome reception, continental breakfast, morning beverage service, and afternoon snack breaks each day. Additionally, all exhibitor materials, conference session materials, and NaBITA developed supplemental materials are also included. All other meals, lodging, and transportation costs are the responsibility of the participants.

Conference registration is not included in any pre- or post-conference training opportunities. A separate registration fee is required for general conference attendance.

Registration fees apply to all attendees, including retainer clients, super and premium membership categories, and all concurrent session presenters. 


Pre- & Post-Conference Opportunities

General conference attendance is not required to attend a pre- or post-conference event. Conference registration is not included in any pre- or post-conference training opportunities. A separate registration and fee is required for the general conference attendance. You do not need to attend the conference to attend a pre- or post-conference.

Pre-Conferences

Sunday, November 10th & Monday, November 11th, 2019, 9am-5pm daily

Post-Conferences

Wednesday, November 13th, 2019, 2pm-5pm, Thursday, November 14th, 2019, 9am-5pm, & Friday, November 15th, 2019, 9am-12pm

Please click here to register online.
Please click here to register by cheque.
Extended Registration Rates (Register after Monday, October 28th, 2019)
  • NaBITA Member: $699
  • Non-NaBITA Member: $799

Pre- and post-conference registration fee includes course registration, printed materials, all items listed above, certification, light continental breakfast, and morning and afternoon beverage services. All other meals, including lunch and dinner, lodging, and transportation costs are the responsibility of the participants.

Conference registration is not included in any pre- or post-conference training opportunities. Separate registration fee is required for general conference attendance. You do not need to attend the conference to attend a pre- or post-conference.


Roundtable Discussions

Roundtables are an opportunity for focused, informal conversation with colleagues who are working through many of the same issues on their own campuses.

  1. Partnering with Law Enforcement
  2. Working with Faculty to Manage Students in Distress
  3. BIT Recordkeeping
  4. BIT and Admissions Reviews
  5. Marketing and Educational Strategies
  6. Protests and the BIT
  7. Working with Suicidal Students
  8. PreK-12 BIT

Apply for a Scholarship

In service to the field, NaBITA welcomes the submission of scholarship applications for the upcoming Annual Conference and NaBITA Training Courses as part of our pre-conference and post-conference opportunities. These scholarships aim to assist our colleagues in their professional development and commitment to their chosen profession.

Scholarships will be awarded to applicants based upon written responses to application questions. A limited number of scholarships will be awarded, and submission of an application does not mean a scholarship will be awarded. The receipt of a scholarship award in previous years does not preclude applicants from submission for or receipt of a scholarship.

Scholarship applications were closed on Friday, August 9th, 2019.  Submitters were notified by Friday, August 30th, 2019.


Awards

The NaBITA Conference Committee is excited to announce that it has developed two awards for best practice and research in the field of behavior intervention. The first is the Best Practices/Institutional Impact Award – to recognize a practice or program that can be modeled by other institutions as a best practice and has been shown to have significant evidence-based impact on the originating institution. The second award is Innovation in Research and Publication – to recognize research that is innovative in its topic, methodology, or program(s) studied. The research can be specific to the functioning of a BIT or programs that serve to educate, provide interventions for or reduce risk among target populations. Selected winners will be honored at the national conference, presented their award, and included or highlighted in The Journal of Campus Behavioral Intervention (J-BIT).  

Best Practices/Institutional Impact Award

This award is intended to recognize a practice or program that can be modeled by other institutions as a best practice and has been shown to have significant evidence-based impact on the originating institution. These practices or programs can be those that are specific to the functioning of a BIT or which serve to educate, provide interventions for, or reduce risk among target populations.

Innovation in Research and Publication Award

This award is intended to recognize research that is innovative in its topic, methodology, or program(s) studied. The research can be specific to the functioning of a BIT or programs that serve to educate, provide interventions for or reduce risk among target populations.

Award nomination applications were closed on Friday, August 9th, 2019. Submissions will be reviewed by the Awards committee, and applicants will be notified of acceptance/rejection by Friday, August 30th, 2019.


Conference & Training Event Hotel and Location

Hyatt Regency Coconut Point Resort & Spa
5001 Coconut Rd
Bonita Springs, FL 34134
(239) 444-1234

Please Note: NaBITA does not work with any Hotel Travel Agencies. Reservations for hotel accommodations should be made with the hotel directly. 

The hotel is now completely sold out. 

Transportation

AIRPORT

The Southwest Florida International Airport (RSW) is a 20-minute ride from the Hyatt. For more information, please visit https://www.flylcpa.com/.

LOCAL TRANSPORTATION

LB Transportation, located at the resort, provides airport transfers to RSW International Airport, located just 14 miles or about a 20 minute drive from the hotel. The airport serves the Southwest Florida Region of Naples and Fort Myers.

Reserve Transportation
Starting at $45

PARKING
Self-parking is included for all NaBITA attendees who are a guest of the hotel.
Guest self-parking: $16/Overnight
Guest self-parking (max $16): $2/Hourly

Valet Parking
With in/out privileges: $25/Overnight
With in/out privileges: $12/Daily

More information on transportation options can be found on the hotel website, located here.


NaBITA Policies

Guests with Special Needs

For attendees that require ADA accommodations or meal accommodations based on medical or religious requirements, please contact conference@nabita.org.

Refund Policy

NaBITA understands that circumstances change and events may arise that prohibit your ability to attend an event after you have registered. NaBITA will allow another individual from your institution to attend in your place OR you may attend a future NaBITA event with an equivalent registration rate. If you do not wish to send someone in your place or attend a future training event, your registration will only be refunded based on the schedule below.

Registration cancellation by June 21, 2019 = 100% refund

Registration cancellation by July 19, 2018 = 75% refund

Registration cancellation by August 23, 2019 = 50% refund

Registration cancellation by September 20, 2019 = 25% refund

Registration cancellation after September 20, 2019 = no refunds

For more information on the NaBITA Annual Conference, please contact conference@nabita.org, or via phone, at 484-321-3651.


Contact the Conference Committee

For more information, please contact the NaBITA Conference Committee at conference@nabita.org or 484-321-3651.