The Standards Self-Assessment Tool

The Standards Self-Assessment Tool (SSAT) is provided as a tool to complement the 2018 NaBITA Standards for Behavioral Intervention Teams. BITs can assess their performance on each of the 20 standards in order to identify areas of best practice and opportunities for improvement. The SSAT includes descriptions of teams performing along each of the 4 performance levels as well as suggested team documents to review in order to gather evidence for your assessment. The tool should be used in conjunction with further training and study. Thank you to Dr. Amy Murphy for authorship of this rubric.

  1. DEFINE BIT
    BITs are small groups of school officials who meet regularly to collect and review concerning information abou at risk community members and develop intervention plans to assist them.
    Evidence: team mission, BIT operations manual, marketing, meeting agendas
    The activities of the BIT are not defined and do not include the main functions:
    1. gathering data,
    2. objective analysis of data, and
    3. intervention and follow-up.
    The BIT does not use an assessment process.
    The activities of the BIT are somewhat defined and include one or two of the main functions:
    1. gathering data,
    2. objective analysis of data, and
    3. intervention and follow-up.
    The BIT uses some assessment processes.
    The activities of the BIT are defined and mostly include the three main functions:
    1. gathering data,
    2. objective analysis of data, and
    3. intervention and follow-up.
    4. The BIT utilizes ongoing and circular assessment processes.
    The BIT utilizes regular assessment processes.
    The activities of the BIT are clear, well-defined, and include the three main functions:
    1. gathering data,
    2. objective analysis of data, and
    3. intervention and follow-up.
    The BIT utilizes ongoing and circular assessment processes.
  2. PREVENTION VS. THREAT ASSESSMENT
    Schools have an integrated team that addresses early intervention cases, as well as threat assessment cases.
    Evidence: team mission, BIT operations Manual, marketing, reporting and data analysis
    The BIT does not incorporate both early intervention/prevention activities and threat assessment in its work.

    Other teams exist at the school with these roles, and silos of communication exist between the teams.
    The BIT incorporates some elements of early intervention/prevention activities and threat assessment in its work.

    Other teams exist at the school with overlapping roles, and silos of communication exist between the teams.
    The BIT is designed to identify early indicators of escalating and concerning behaviors in order to identify and intervene before threats are formalized. Threat assessment is one component of the BIT’s activities into prevention work.

    There is another team at the school with some overlap of roles, but communication, marketing, and reporting is coordinated to reduce silos.
    The BIT is designed to identify early indicators of escalating and concerning behaviors in order to identify and intervene before threats are formalized. Threat assessment is one component of the BIT’s activities in addition to prevention work.

    There is little to no overlap of roles with separate teams in the school, and silos are minimized.
  3. TEAM NAME
    Team names communicate the role and function in a way that resonates with the campus community.
    Evidence: name of team, marketing materials
    The team does not have an established, consistent name.
    The team name is in transition or not well-known. The name may include an odd acronym or feel cliché. There are concerns that the name may overemphasize threat assessment or law enforcement.
    The team name communicates the role, function, and purpose of the team to members of the school community. The name communicates a philosophy of support and encouragement for those reported to the team.
    The team name clearly communicates the role, function, and purpose of the team to members of the school community.

    The name communicates a philosophy of support and encouragement for those reported to the team.

    The name resonates with the unique school climate and appeals to the school community.
  4. TEAM LEADERSHIP
    Team leaders serve to bring the team together and keep discussions productive and focused while maintaining a long-term view of team development and education.
    Evidence: BIT operations manual, team agendas, team training schedule, feedback from membership
    The BIT does not have a consistent leader or chairperson.
    The BIT has a consistent leader or chairperson.
    The BIT has a defined and consistent leader or chairperson.

    The leader provides oversight to regular team functions while also planning for the long-term development of the team.
    The BIT has a clearly defined, consistent leader or chairperson.

    The leader provides oversight to regular team functions while also planning for the long-term development of the team.

    The leader is aware of team challenges and limitations and works to address them in a timely manner.

    The leader is respected by the team, holds a position appropriate for the role of BIT chair, and promotes a positive and trusting team climate.
  5. TEAM MEMBERSHIP
    Teams are comprised of at least 5, but no more than 10 members, and should at a minimum include the core representatives of a BIT.
    Evidence: BIT operations manual, membership list, appointment letters, team trainings
    The BIT membership is undefined.
    The BIT membership is less than 5 or more than 10. Membership does not represent the school context or creates limitations for BIT functions.

    Membership roles and involvement are not well-defined or clear.
    The BIT membership is between 5 and 10 members. Membership minimally includes: an administrative generalist (Dean of Students, Principal, Assistant Principal), mental health representative (counselor), conduct or disciplinary representative, and a police/law enforcement/school resource officer representative. Membership is representative of the school.
    The BIT membership is between 5 and 10 members. Membership minimally includes: an administrative generalist (Dean of Students, Principal, Assistant Principal), mental health representative (counselor), conduct or disciplinary representative, and a police/law enforcement/school resource officer representative. Membership is representative of the school.

    Outside of this core and inner group membership, other representatives in the school are clearly defined, trained, and attend meetings as necessary.

    Members have clear roles and involvement as well as varied access levels to database based on roles.
  6. MEETING FREQUENCY
    Teams have regularly scheduled meetings at least twice a month with the capacity to hold emergency meetings immediately when needed.
    Evidence: meeting schedule, agendas, team training information
    The BIT meets as needed and does not have a regularly scheduled meeting time.
    The BIT meets at a regularly scheduled time. The BIT sometimes cancels meetings.
    The BIT meets once a week or every other week at a regularly scheduled time and location for 60-90 minutes.

    A meeting agenda is circulated prior to the team meeting. The BIT has the capability of calling emergency meetings as needed. The team rarely cancels meetings and instead uses this time for team training and development.
    The BIT meets once a week at a regularly scheduled time and location for 60-90 minutes.

    A meeting agenda is circulated prior to the team meeting. The BIT has conference phone or video technology capabilities to use as needed for emergency meetings. The BIT does not cancel meetings, and instead this time is used for team training and development.
  7. TEAM MISSION
    Teams have a clear mission statement which identifies the scope of the team, balances the needs of the individual and the community, defines threat assessment as well as early intervention efforts, and is connected to the academic mission.
    Evidence: mission statement, marketing materials
    The BIT does not have a mission statement.
    The BIT has a mission statement which identifies the purpose and scope of the team.
    The BIT has a clear mission statement which identifies the purpose and scope of the team as focused on early intervention efforts and threat assessment with a goal of safety and well-being for members of the school community.

    The mission is connected to the academic mission of the institution.
    The BIT has a clear mission statement which identifies the purpose and scope of the team as focused on prevention, mitigation, and threat assessment with a goal of safety and well-being for members of the school community.

    The mission also communicates a responsiveness to concerns while balancing the needs of the individual and the community.

    The mission is connected to the academic mission of the institution.
  8. TEAM SCOPE
    Teams address concerning behavior among students, faculty/staff, affiliated members and should work in conjunction with appropriate law enforcement and human resource agencies when needed.
    Evidence: BIT operations manual, marketing materials, mission statement
    The BIT does not have a defined scope of responsibility.
    The BIT has a defined scope of responsibility.

    The scope defines what types of concerns are addressed by the team.
    The BIT has a clear and defined scope of responsibility which includes what types of concerns are addressed and how the team coordinates related to concerns outside their scope of responsibility.
    The BIT has a clear and defined scope of responsibility.

    The team addresses concerns related to students, employees, and affiliated members (parents, alumni, visitors) and coordinates as appropriate with human resources and/or law enforcement.

    The BIT responds to incidents regardless of enrollment status and physical geography.
  9. POLICY AND PROCEDURE MANUAL
    Teams have a policy and procedure manual that is updated each year to reflect changes in policy and procedures the team puts into place.
    Evidence: BIT operations manual
    The BIT does not have a policy and procedure manual.
    The BIT has a policy and procedure manual to guide team functions.
    The BIT has a policy and procedure manual that provides clear guidelines and directions for team functions and activities.

    The document is updated regularly. The document includes most of the following elements: mission statement, membership, regular team functions, team communications, community engagement and marketing, documentation and records, threat assessment tools, interventions, and quality assurance.

    The manual is sufficient to guide a team in consistent operations.
    The BIT has a policy and procedures manual that provides clear guidelines and directions for team functions and activities.

    The manual is updated at least annually. The document includes information on the mission statement, membership, regular team functions, team communications, community engagement and marketing, documentation and records, threat assessment tools, interventions, and quality assurance. Examples of documents are also included such as agendas, reports, training schedules, marketing items, and informed consents.

    The manual is sufficient to guide a team in consistent operations.
  10. TEAM BUDGET
    Teams have an established budget in order to meet the ongoing needs of the team and the community it serves.
    Evidence: budget information
    The BIT does not have any designated funds to operate.
    The BIT has some designated budgetary funds to operate.
    The BIT has a designated and established budget sufficient to meet the ongoing needs of the team.
    The BIT has a designated and established budget sufficient to meet the ongoing needs of the team.

    The budget may occur through an annual allocation or be shared across departments and transferred into a central fund.

    The budget aligns with strategic goals for the team.
  11. OBJECTIVE RISK RUBRIC
    Teams have an evidence-based, objective risk rubric that is used for each case that comes to the attention of the team.
    Evidence: risk rubric, case notes with risk ratings, pattern analysis of risk ratings, team training documentation, BIT operations manual
    The BIT does not use a risk rubric to evaluate risk levels of cases.
    The BIT uses a risk rubric on all or most cases. The team members are trained on the rubric.
    The BIT uses an evidence-based objective risk rubric on all cases.

    The rubric includes a broad definition of behaviors including mental health and disruptive behaviors as well as threats, ideations, or behaviors that put others at risk.

    Team members are trained on the rubric.
    The BIT consistently utilizes an evidence-based, objective risk rubric on all cases each time they are discussed.

    The rubric includes a broad definition of behaviors including mental health and disruptive behaviors as well as threats, ideations or behaviors that put others at risk.

    The rubric is designed for the team’s setting (higher education, secondary education, etc.)

    The rubric is accessible to all team members through multiple formats (paper, electronic, app, etc.) Team members participate in ongoing training on the rubric. The team regularly reviews patterns of rubric ratings for consistency and calibration.
  12. INTERVENTIONS
    A team clearly defines its actions and interventions for each risk level associated with the objective risk rubric they have in place for their team.
    Evidence: list of interventions/action items, risk rubric, case notes with risk rubrics and interventions, pattern analysis of interventions, BIT operations manual
    The BIT does not define a range of interventions to select for cases.
    The BIT selects interventions for cases. A range of interventions are used.
    The BIT selects interventions/actions based on the risk level assigned for cases.

    A range of interventions are defined for each risk level and include a threat/violence risk assessment.
    The BIT selects interventions/actions based on the risk level assigned for all cases. Interventions are clearly defined for each risk level and include a wide range of options that can be tailored based on evolving case information.

    This includes a clear trigger for a threat/violence risk assessment.
  13. CASE MANAGEMENT
    Teams invest in case management as a process, and often a position, that provides flexible, need-based support for students to overcome challenges.
    Evidence: case manager position description, team trainings related to case management, case notes with risk rubric and case management interventions, BIT operations manual
    The BIT does not use case management processes as an intervention on cases.
    The BIT uses case management processes occasionally as an intervention on cases.

    The BIT does not have dedicated resources from a position or members of the team for case management processes.
    The BIT uses case management processes regularly as an intervention on cases.

    The BIT has a dedicated case manager position on the team or assigns case management duties to members of the team.

    The case management process is solution-focused with support for overcoming challenges and works across departments without silos.
    The BIT uses case management processes regularly and consistently as an intervention on cases.

    The BIT has a dedicated case manager position on the team or assigns case management duties to members of the team.

    The case management process is comprehensive including responsibilities such as conducting intakes, risk assessments, assisting with accessing resources, developing success plans, fostering resiliency, and self-reliance.

    The case management process is solution-focused with support for overcoming challenges, goal-oriented, and works across departments without silos.
  14. ADVERTISING AND MARKETING
    Teams market their services, as well as educate and train their communities about what and how to report to the BIT, through marketing campaigns, websites, logos, and educational services.
    Evidence: examples of marketing and advertising efforts, written marketing plan, BIT operations manual
    The BIT does not use marketing and advertising processes to educate and train their community on BIT.
    The BIT uses marketing and advertising processes to educate and train their community on reporting to the BIT.
    The BIT uses ongoing marketing and advertising processes to educate and train their community on reporting to the BIT, BIT roles and resources, and to nurture referral sources for future reports.

    Marketing and advertising efforts include a website and other active and passive marketing campaign components.

    The BIT hosts regular educational sessions to train departments and units.
    The BIT uses ongoing marketing and advertising processes to educate and train their community on reporting to the BIT, BIT roles and resources, and to nurture referral sources for future reports.

    Marketing and advertising efforts include a website and other marketing campaign components such as a logo, brochures, videos, signage, and a list of disruptive and dangerous behaviors to report.

    The BIT hosts regular educational sessions to train departments and units and participates in collaborative programs such as orientation. The BIT has a marketing plan which identifies stakeholders and reaches all members of its community through both passive and active marketing efforts.
  15. RECORDKEEPING
    Teams use an electronic data management system to keep records of all referrals and cases.
    Evidence: case record analysis and accuracy, system capabilities and usage, data reports
    The BIT does not use an electronic data management system to maintain case reports and notes.
    The BIT uses an electronic data management system to maintain all reports and case notes.
    The BIT uses a robust, electronic data management system to maintain all reports and case notes.

    The system allows for data to be electronically entered and stored in a way that is easily retrievable, searchable, and secure.

    The system is accessible for all BIT members and facilitates communication among the team.

    The BIT is trained on member recordkeeping responsibilities and the system is updated regularly and consistently when the team meets and generates new risk ratings, interventions, and case updates.
    The BIT uses a robust, electronic data management system to maintain all reports and case notes.

    The system allows for data to be electronically entered and stored in a way that is easily retrievable, searchable, and secure.

    The system is accessible for all BIT members, facilitates communication among the team, and can generate reports to analyze patterns of data. The system supports reporting efforts by offering an online reporting form.

    The team has policies related to confidentiality standards (FERPA, HIPAA, and state confidentiality laws, record expungement, and transcript notation).

    The BIT is trained on member recordkeeping responsibilities and the system is updated regularly and consistently when the team meets and generates new risk ratings, interventions, and case updates. BIT records are differentiated from counseling, health, conduct, or other student records.
  16. TEAM TRAINING
    Teams engage in regular, ongoing training on issues related to BIT functions, risk assessment, team processes, and topical knowledge related to common presenting concerns.
    Evidence: team training schedule, training content
    The BIT does not participate in training or development activities.
    The BIT participates in training and development activities occasionally.
    The BIT participates in regular, ongoing training related to BIT functions, risk assessments, team processes, and topical knowledge related to common presenting concerns.

    The BIT plans and documents training activities. New team members participate in trainings for BIT tools, systems, and processes.
    The BIT participates in regular, ongoing training related to BIT functions, risk assessments, team processes, and topical knowledge related to common presenting concerns. Topics include advanced topics such as cultural competency, legal updates, and threat assessment.

    The BIT plans and documents trainings with an annual professional development schedule including conferences, workshops, online webinars, tabletop exercises, external trainers/consultants, and article/book discussions.

    New team members participate in onboarding training for BIT tools, systems, and processes. Instead of cancelling BIT meetings, the BIT uses this dedicated time for training activities.
  17. PSYCHOLOGICAL, THREAT, AND VIOLENCE RISK ASSESSMENTS
    BITs conduct threat and violence risk assessment as part of their overall approach to prevention and intervention.
    Evidence: risk assessment tools, case notes with risk assessments, team trainings, BIT operations manual
    The BIT does not use psychological, threat, and violence risk assessments.

    The BIT does not have access to psychological, threat, or violence risk assessments.
    The BIT has some capacity to use psychological, threat, and violence risk assessments, but the team may not have access to all three or may not have a clear understanding of the different purposes of the assessments.

    Some members of the team are trained in one or more of the risk assessment types.
    The BIT uses psychological, threat, and violence risk assessments as part of their overall approach to prevention and intervention. The BIT understands the difference in the various risk assessments and has defined risk levels when risk assessments are used.

    Some members of the team are trained in advanced threat assessment tools and perform the threat assessments.
    The BIT uses psychological, threat, and violence risk assessments as part of their overall approach to prevention and intervention.

    The BIT understands the difference in the various risk assessments and has clearly defined risk levels when risk assessments are used.

    The BIT specifically has a violence risk assessment capacity with the full team trained in advanced threat assessment tools and 3-4 members identified to perform the threat assessments.
  18. SUPERVISION
    The BIT chair regularly meets with members individually to assess their functional capacity and workload and to offer guidance and additional resources to improve team membership performance.
    Evidence: meeting documentation from BIT chair, BIT agendas with team discussions, position descriptions
    The BIT members receive little to no guidance and supervision.

    The BIT struggles with conflict and opportunities for team development.
    The BIT members receive some guidance and supervision from the BIT chair.

    The BIT chair assists with managing team conflict and promoting team development.
    The BIT members receive clear guidance and supervision.

    The BIT chair meets once a semester with each team member to discuss team roles and responsibilities, to assess their functional capacity and workload on the team, and to offer guidance and resources to improve membership performance. The BIT chair addresses team conflicts and facilitates team development.
    The BIT members receive clear guidance and supervision.

    The BIT chair meets twice a semester with each team member to discuss team roles and responsibilities, to assess their functional capacity and workload on the team, and to offer guidance and resources to improve membership performance.

    The BIT chair effectively addresses team conflicts and facilitates team development.
  19. END OF SEMESTER AND YEAR REPORTS
    Teams collect and share data on referrals and cases to identify trends and patterns and adjust resources and training.
    Evidence: semester and annual reports, strategic plan
    The BIT does not produce reporting on BIT activities. The BIT does not participate in strategic planning or assessment activities.
    The BIT produces reports as needed on BIT activities, trends, and patterns of referrals and cases, as well as implications for BIT resources and training.
    The BIT collects, prepares, and disseminates data on BIT activities for end of semester and annual report. Reports include trends and patterns of referrals and cases as well as implications for BIT resources and training.

    The BIT participates in regular strategic planning and assessment activities.
    The BIT collects, prepares, and disseminates data on BIT activities for an end of semester and annual report. Reports include trends and patterns of referrals and cases, as well as implications for BIT resources and training. Reports include demographic data about referrals, types of referrals, referral source, risk ratings at open and close of cases, interventions used, team trainings, team accomplishments, and areas for improvement.

    The BIT also has a strategic plan that includes assessment activities and goals for BIT outcomes, including items such as satisfaction surveys, retention data, and pre- and post-surveys.
  20. TEAM AUDIT
    Teams assess the BIT structure and processes and ensure it is functioning well and aligning with best practices.
    Evidence: audit reports, end of semester and annual reports
    The BIT does not participate in assessment activities or team audits.
    The BIT has participated in assessment activities and team audits, but they are irregular, incomplete, or inconsistent.
    The BIT participates in regular, ongoing, and circular assessment activities and team audits to gauge the status of team functions and practices.

    There is a documented pattern of improvements and resources resulting from team audits.
    The BIT participates in regular, ongoing, and circular assessment activities including a bi-annual team audit to gauge the status of team functions and practices. Team audits include multiple activities such as an internal or external review, Core-Q10 assessment, SSAT, and documentation/evidence review.

    The audit concludes with recommendations for continuous improvement. There is a documented pattern of improvements and resources resulting from team audits.

Score: 0

Exemplary (18-20 points with no areas ranked below proficient)

BIT operations exemplify the standards of practice identified by NaBITA. Focus on identifying ways to sustain this level of performance and improve on any areas that are merely proficient.

Proficient (15-17.75 points and 3 or fewer areas rated below proficient)

BIT operations are proficient. They meet the basic standard of practice identified by NaBITA. Review the standards and related resources to continue improving and developing. Create a plan of action for continuous improvement. For any standards rated below proficient, review the resources outlined in the Team Training Template related to each of these areas.

Needs Improvement (12-14.75 points or more than 3 areas rated below proficient)

BIT operations include some components related to BIT standards of practice, but they need additional development. For any standards rated below proficient, review the resources outlined in the Team Training Template related to each of these areas.

Deficient (0-11.75 points)

BIT operations are not in alignment with standards of practice identified by NaBITA and may be increasing the risks associated with BIT activities. For standards rated below proficient, review the resources outlined in the Team Training Template related to each of these areas.

To learn more about our training resources, take a look at our NaBITA training schedule.

To attend one of our certification courses, take a look at our certification schedule.

Note: Dangerousness and violence, from a student , faculty, or staff member is difficult, if not impossible, to accurately predict. This training topic offers research-based techniques and theories to provide a foundational understanding and improved awareness of the potential risk. The training or tool should not be seen as a guarantee or offer any assurance that violence will be prevented.